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is it that they seem to be interested in? it is so obvious. do you think this rule of law has been given on day one and suddenly it was followed? of course not. do not think democracy will solve them. it is both your friend and your enemies. hamilton and madison right the document. it is a very good document. ask any of us on the courts, we would be in agreement on the basic things. the basic framework is it creates institutions of democracy. people can decide for themselves what kinds of community they want it is a special kind of democracy. it is a democracy that protect certain basic human rights that assures some degree of equality. the separation of powers is not what you are looking for here. separation of powers -- he is very clear. you are looking for judicial independence. the separation of powers is both vertical and it is also horizontal. the basic function is not to preserve a rule of law. it is to divide power into pockets. you prevent any group of people from being too powerful. that is the basic purpose. finally, a rule of law. you have a document that is trying to restore democratic
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
that will become law. yes, it is a tough vote, a very complicated, complex issue. it is something that many of us had been fighting for in the particulars of this and in personal lives as well. it was a very high priority for us. let's just say money. big money out there on the sides of those who would not be opposed. by the way, i do not paint all hunters with the same brush. i think this gives hunters a bad name. it is undeserved. many of them think it should be banned and that is what i am so proud that we are taking that view to make that distinction. there were no prospects of success and we one of the members to be here to continue to make about fight so that when there was a prospect of success they would be here rather than being cleared out by the nra. we saw that in 1994 when we were cleared out. >> let me add to that. one of my jobs is the job of chief deputy whip. back in that time, we had to vote to pass sensible gun legislation through the house, but when the senate said they could not do 60 votes, the leader made the decision that it really was not the thing to do at that time when
in a couple of days, the losses of every american's paycheck will get a lot smaller. -- the law assays that every american's paycheck will get a little smaller. but congress can prevent it from happening, if they act now. we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. but if an agreement is not reached on time, then i will urge the senate to hold an upward bound to vote on a basic package that protects the middle class from an income tax hike, extends vital unemployment insurance for americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future progress. such a proposal could pass both houses with bipartisan majorities, as long as these leaders allow to come to a vote. if they still want to vote no, that is their prerogative. but they should let everybody else vote as well. that is the way this is supposed to work. we cannot afford a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. the economy is growing. the folks you sent to washington have to do their jobs. the housing market is healing, but that could stall if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. unemploym
in the asian average unit. she is a graduate of harvard law school and johns hopkins university. she is a contributing author to consumer credit and landing. welcome to both of you. >> thank you for the opportunity to be here before you today. let me touch on a few highlights of the testimony we have already submitted. we talked a little bit about credit reports and whether consumers understand them or not but the strongest advocate for me is a consumer. when the bank does not know me, 40 million of us moved every year and a credit report is the bridge that tells my story. it is about my hard work and help pay my bills and the good decisions i make and personal responsibility. credit reports are an incredible indicator to others, everything else about you want someone to know about me. usaid, the other banks are so involved and supportive of credit reporting that they are involved in spreading this good news around the world. i serve on an international task force to advance credit reporting and other parts of the world. the system is big. the report laid out very well, 200 million p
of connecticut a similar law to the one adopted here banning assault weapons. this has been a heroin, terrific week in the state of connecticut, culminating in today's moment of silence at 9:30. the end of the week and i spent the better part of the time meeting with first responders, families, going to funerals and wakes and speaking with ordinary people of newtown and the state of connecticut. the refrain i have heard over and over again from newtown and connecticut and all the run the country is you need to do something about the guns. the nra statement today is sadly and shamefully inadequate, calling for more guns and rejecting real action against gun violence. at a defining a historic moment for our nation demanding courageous leadership, the nra has declined to step forward as a credible and constructive partner. the proposal for more armed guards in schools may be helpful in some instances, but it falls short of the strong, serious comprehensive action needed to stop the kind of horrific tragedy that occurred last week. many police that spoke to me on that day when we take a said that
christmas, everyone. thank you. law before the president delivered his remarks, he spoke with house speaker john deere. speaker boehner will return to the holidays -- will return to washington after the holidays. >> house minority leader nancy pelosi and other democratic leaders also briefed reporters on friday. the your pelosi says that she remains optimistic and that congress should not leave washington without a clear path to a solution. they also responded to the nra's news conference from earlier in the day. this is about 35 minutes. >> good afternoon. for weeks, we have an saying that christmas is coming, and time is growing short. now christmas is upon us, and there is very little time left, but there is still a chance. there is still a chance to reach an agreement that is balanced. the president made concessions in his latest proposal, and we hope republicans will consider it so we can iron out for their differences and bring it to the floor. president obama moved closer to the republicans on rates, tax rates, and said that in terms of spending cuts, he was willing to make more spen
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
's for it to be approved and signed into law. today's the 27th. the senate comes back in session today, the house is in pro-forma so it probably will not do any work. you only have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal -- ink a deal. the president took off last night from hawaii, but there's a five-hour time difference. time is working against these lawmakers. they will have to figure out something if they want to do anything before new year's. it seems quite likely that we are going to go over this cliff and that whatever happens is going to have to be resolved after january 1. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someo
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
. >> nancy, you went to harvard law school. you went to oxford. you could have done so many things. how did you end up at the white house? >> i could have done many things and i have done many things. i started off as a lawyer. i am from a small town. my mom raised three kids on her own. she did not have a college education, but she is viewed in me that i could have one. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know that she wanted me to do very well in school. when i would talk to her about one in to work in the white house sunday or being interested in politics, she would say you have to study hard and get good grades because you will need a scholarship. i cannot afford it, but she never said i could not do it. that was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i went to law school. in the early 1980's, when i got out of law school and was going around to law firms, even at that point, there were not many women in law firms. people would sit me down and say, do you understand that if we take you into this law firm, you will have to try cases? [laughter] t
of renewable energy. these things are some of the changes in environmental law relative to emissions -- they are all part of that effort. we have got to do more. we have to build on that. but it is certainly a commitment. one thing we recognize is that it does not have to be a competition between our economy and our health, because renewable energy and clean energy have economic benefits that are pronounced, and people understand that. so we highlighted the issues we felt needed to be highlighted for voters who are going to make the decision in the election, but the president's agenda is reflected in his work, and i expect he will continue to work hard on this issue is. >> let's take these last questions as we wrap this up. >> thanks for coming back to the university of chicago. i have a quick follow up. yourding super pac's -- just now reclaim your concerns about unlimited money in campaign financing. on the other hand, we saw earlier today had democrats were already oiling up their machines for 2014 and 2016. what are the prospects for repealing citizens united or comprehensive cam
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
steps. but in 10 days, we face a deadline. in 10 days, under current law, tax rates are scheduled to rise on most americans. and even though democrats and republicans are arguing about whether those rates should go up for the wealthiest individuals, all of us, every single one of us, agrees that tax rates should not go up for the other 98% of americans, which includes 97% of small businesses. every member of congress believes that. every democrat. every republican. so there is absolutely no reason not to protect these americans from a tax hike. but the very least, let us agree right now on what we already agree on. let us get that done. i just spoke to speaker boehner and met with senator reid. i have asked congress to work on a package that prevents a tax hike on middle-class americans, protect unemployment insurance for 2 million americans, and lays the groundwork for further work on growth and deficit reduction. that is an achievable goal. that can get done in 10 days. once this legislation is agreed to, i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it p
to work at the state level. we saw last week the state of michigan adopted a new law that gave workers the freedom not to join a union. now, they didn't do that because it was politically expedient or that they thought it was a good idea, because it actually is probably going to get a lot of the politicians in hot water in michigan. but what they did is looked at 23 other states who had adopted the same idea and saw that they were attracting businesses and creating jobs, and these states without raising taxes had more revenue to build schools and roads and hospitals. it was just an idea that worked. it's not a political idea to give people the freedom not to join a union, it's an american idea and it's an idea that works. we can look around the country today and again, we make these things political and give them labels that are good or bad, depending on, i guess, which party you're in. but we know a number of states have been real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
would be -- so much fun. then he ran for the u.s. senate and told me to go off to law school. he said, you have been on enough losing campaigns in your life. then i went to law school and came back to new hampshire. i had had a big opening at a college that was all male for 200 years. i feel we have been forging our way, but luckily i had a governor shaheen, my mother, who mentored her, and i have been mentored by colleagues. i thing the opportunities are coming in abundance now. doors are open, law schools are more than 50% women. our class going into congress is the most diverse class ever, in all aspects. fascinating. so anyone younger than me, there are wide open opportunities. >> we all have a debt of gratitude to governor shaheen and senator ayotte for serving as attorney general. when my mother ran for congress, up 15% of voters would not even consider a woman candidate. when i think of the courage -- for the rest of us, now women on the ballot are very much accepted. >> i have to tell a story. susan used to tell the story about campaigning in that 1980 election. one time she w
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
like as prescribed by law that were kind of these catchalls that again opened the door to future abuse or limits on citizenship or on citizen rights. >> so rights were articulated but not guaranteed? >> rights were articulated but not guaranteed, and actually open to constraint and to limitations through future legislation. overall, the system didn't change dramatically. you still had a very highly centralized form of government, still very, very presidential, although it is theoretically a mixed system. it still leaves most of the power in the president's hands. and so in terms of the structure of government institutions and checks and balances, there hasn't been a whole lot new introduced. in terms of the process, i think this is where it has taken a bad situation, ordinary controversies, what might have been considered ordinary controversies, and actually made the situation much worse because at each stage the process was fundamentally flawed and only became more so over time. and we can get into details but i don't want to dominate. >> okay. so if i understand you correctly, you're
agency. >> of my understanding of the law is it requires the supply the furnisher with all the information. is that a violation of a lot of the have not provided -- it is a technology issue that i think to be fixed easily enough? second, it is just an issue they make a determination. is that a violation of fcra or a violation of the law? >> our purpose of putting together this paper that is characteristic of the work of all of our market teams is supposed to be prescriptive instead of descriptive. what we are describing is what we have heard. we have many tools and which we could make determinations about whether the law is being violated or not. in this is, that is what is going to happen. we have found this information is not being forwarded. >> is it a fair statement to say that consumers must provide evidence when they challenge a credit score, but the creditors are taken at their word? >> to describe the system that way i think would be accurate. you are saying the consumer can provide information. it will not get to the furniture necessarily in the way they provided i
think when people have broken the law, they should face the full force of the criminal law. what punishment we should design for people who sold our gold at half price is another matter altogether. >> you mentioned a terrible condition that destroys lives -- will my honorable friend the commending the county council on local health care, developing dementia portal that is providing services to dementia sufferers and their carers? >> i am happy to join in pain to be to the council. we need to do far more as a country to tackle dementia. there are three important parts -- first is to recognize this is a disease, and not just a natural part of aging. we need to increase the research in hospitals and care homes and make sure there is far more dignity. it is something we're all communities have to come together and make more dementia- friendly communities, and that bring organizations together, as they have obviously done there. >> one minister has pleaded guilty for charges -- can the prime minister please remind the house how many times he has ridden with the hunt, and whether he us
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
the law firm anyway. it is a cultural thing, and folks don't necessarily want to change. you're talking about the scale of citizens that is a significant challenge from the cultural standpoint. standards need to evolve and architecture is of the application need to evolve with it. it is as simple as that. until those things happen, it is not going to happen. it is starting to happen from an application standpoint moving to the enterprise -- we are seeing it happen certainly in the commercial side. >> let me lay out a plausible scenario. i cannot say this is the way it is going to happen. i think that electronic voting will be one of these overnight major election shifts, not a gradual buildup. i also think we have missed the online website version of that. part because it has not shown its reliable and secure. there is a very rapid emerging -- i think it will sweep through the country similarly with your cellphone is essentially part of your identity for processing. >> there will be some experimentation -- it will be lots of little elections and all of a sudden it will hit a major state
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of things that my colleague has said, but is also a failure because of the elements appear of corruption. soldiers are not paid on a regular basis. they are not sustained and read what in the field -- and reequippe
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
. they might own the light. there is another company, maybe a goldman sachs or a large law firm, that advises on that glass. ee often talk about the interi information superhighway. i like to think of it more that a network is a car that is tugging along the highway side- by-side with other networks. there is definitely a layering going on. that is crucial to understanding the way that the networks and internet operate individually and on a global basis and interconnect and very specifically. >> is there any fear that messages or whatever is being carrying on those networks could get lost? such as you took the wrong offramp on highway question mar. >> certainly. and are encoded with an address. sometimes those end up in the wrong place. it is based on trust. the routing system is based on trust and the network saying, i am over here. here are the networks behind me that you can reach through me. that announcement is not prescribed and is not really regulated based on the competence and trust of a given network engineer. occasionally and this happened last week, a network all say, actually the
. he says, first of all, -- there is anger directed at conservative law make es. that fractures reaction means boehner is unlick to face significant challenge to his decision as speaker in the near term. the question is who is at the table? does he negotiate from a position of strength when it comes to this next round with the president and senator mcconnell? he is at the table, senator reid, and others. guest: i am not sure that john boehner will be at the table. he said it is now up to the senate, i am going home. it is not taking my ball and going home, but it is doing as much as you can. he is literally looking to his republican colleagues in the senate to work with harry reid to get something acceptable. if he does, that will put significant pressure on house republicans that did not otherwise exist. i want to push back a little bit. since may, i thought that john boehner -- he made a speech back in december where he talked about $1 for spending cuts for every $1 increase in borrowing. red meat for the tea party wing. it was clearly an attempt to say, i am your guy. it is n
up with a solution that will become law. address fiscal challenges while protecting families. >> may i inquire how much time on each side? >> 7 and 14 minutes. >> the gentleman from new york. >> thank you. i yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from texas. >> recognized for 3 minutes. >> i thank the gentle lady and the chairman. when i mention the words hurricane sandy and the tragedy in newton, connecticut, many would wonder what do they have in common. an enormous gun tragedy and the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm. our hearts go out to those babies lost. it speaks to americans in need. that is why i am so trouble to be on the floor today. the framework we have says to america when you are in need, we will not be prepared to help you. what is disappointing, and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case. just about three days ago, we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework offered and the leadership of this house. it is disappointing. in the course of a couple of days, we have come to a situation where this plan, p
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
that there ideas are not stolen either. rule of law, transparency, a neutral legal system -- how much time do you spend on piracy issues? -- system? >> how much time do you spend on piracy issues? >> a lot of time. the president was very clear the drive got to enforce the rules to insure fairness. china has benefited enormously from its secession from the wto. if we and united states are ever to have additional trade agreements with other countries, the american people and american congress have to believe that we will make sure that when we lower barriers and open our markets to companies from other countries, but those other countries will also do the same for america. that is why the president was very clear in the campaign. we're going to hold other countries feet to the fire to ensure a level playing field. >> do you think this is something that chinese leaders respond to? >> yes. the chinese leaders will try to give a push and see if you back up. and if you do, they will give you another push. they do respect strength. at some point you have to say, we cannot back up any more. on some of th
trillion over ten years. here we are today, december 19, and these law changes which i referenced earlier, the end of the bush era tax cuts, the dreaded sequester, across the board cuts of $1.2 trillion in spending will begin to take effect the first of next year. the good news is the white house and republicans have been trading proposals and at least yesterday appeared to be moving closer together. i would have much preferred that they would be talking about a bigger package than they've discussed but nonetheless to reach a package that would resolve some of these issues would be an important step forward and i think help promote certainty that would be important to our economy. on the revenue side of the equation, i just want to remind you what it's taken in the past to balance the budget. we hear talk on average revenue is in the 18% of g.d.p. range n. getting back to average you will should be sufficient. the problem with that is we have never balanced the budget in the last 50 years based on 18% of g.d.p. in revenue. balancedtimes we've going back to 1969, you can see that revenue h
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
by sthradse have that mental illness, but when they go to seek the help from the law enforcement officers, etc., they are advised that they should today? contact with their police, because there's not intervention unless the individual breaks the law, and then they are thrown in with the common lawbreakers in the jail. that's not the way we should treat the sick individuals. we have a society. if obama wants to do something, and anybody, i don't care if you're democrats or republicans, start dealing with the mental health issues that are enabling these people to be put out on the street and have to be concerned and burdened with their family members. like guns are doing away with guns and doing away with the private ownership of guns, and i don't care what kind it is. yes. there's a difference of opinion as far as -- i have many of the individuals that i know that are law enforcement police officers that have them for their personal thing. i respect that. i don't know move them. but that doesn't mean that somebody else doesn't. host: kenneth, we're going to live it there. member of the n.r.a.
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card deb
you are a republican from georgia or a liberal democrat from manhattan, as soon as a law like that gets passed, people become creative in finding ways to qualify. out of the woodwork, all the folks that would qualify. at the end of the david acton & social security age for everybody was truly disabled and let the market take care of its. people in stress occupations for many years now have been leaving those stress occupations well old age of 65 to go into some other line of work. a good example is people that install floors. it's tough in your knees. you see very few people doing that passed the age of 40. they find other work in the construction sector. baseball players have saw money, they don't have to work when they are done. host: let's hear from paul, a republican, in indiana. caller: how are you? there's a competing network of button tot has a access "rise above." if i had a button, it would say stop wasteful spending. how much money we would save if we stop wasteful spending. guest: we could also find our sunny and obscure and ridiculous government spending programs.
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. ♪ ♪ ♪ oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof t
of revenue to the government according to a current law is. that is why the caller said we need to go over the cliff. i'm surprised that many callers were willing to go over the cliff. she mentioned that would be a chance for a recess, i think that is part of what is going on with people who believe they want to go from the republican standpoint, if you go over the cliff and the tax rates go back up, you instantly thought and the tax base. it also means more taxpayers are paying. instead of having 50% of taxpayers having no liability because their income is too low and because of deductions, you have a higher percentage that are pain and a broader base. you have more people to start sweating out more money from. once you do these spending cuts, then you decide from the standpoint of, we have already cut all this money, what do we absolutely need to add that in. in some ways, the reset would be shocking for members of congress to go through it. host: larry, you are on the line. caller: mine is a simple solution. we cannot keep going with the unlimited budget spending. my thought is one item
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